The miner’s song (This is Wales)

The miner’s song – Lyrics

The drum of boots upon the cobbles,
Sound of sons and fathers returning home.
The cold winds blow across the valley;
Down from the mountains capped with snow.
Love lies sighing in the valley,
And my heart is waiting
Where the cold winds blow.

And this is Wales,
Land of our fathers;
This is Wales, a land with soul:
A land of glory,
Of light and darkness,
Where light is song,
And darkness is coal.

The pulse you hear along the valleys,
Sound of sons and fathers coming home;
boots that echo loud tramp firm on cobbles,
The sound of men both young and old.
Their boots are beating upon the cobbles,
Our sons and fathers returning home.

And this is Wales,
Land of our fathers;
This is Wales, a land with soul:
A land of glory,
Of light and darkness,
Where dark is coal
And light is song!

Recording

The music used in this recording belongs in the Public Domain, but the Performance Copyright ℗ belongs to Richard Irwin. You may click the Download Button to obtain the MP3 recording for use in Worship or for personal use only. For other uses of the recording, please Contact Us.

Click Here to Download

Score for male voice choir

The miner’s song (This is Wales) – male voice choir full score

Details

  • Verses: 4
  • Tune: This is Wales
  • Composer: Richard Mark Stephen Irwin (b. 1955)
  • Lyricist: Colin Gordon-Farleigh
  • Usage: Harvest
  • Music Copyright 2016 Richard M S Irwin.
  • Lyrics Copyright 2015 Colin Gordon-Farleigh
  • Performance Copyright © 2016 Richard M S Irwin. All rights reserved.
  • Singer Gary Cordice

We plough the fields and scatter (Wir Pflügen) – Brass Band

Lyrics

We plough the fields, and scatter
The good seed on the land,
But it is fed and watered
By God’s almighty hand;
He sends the snow in winter,
The warmth to swell the grain,
The breezes and the sunshine,
And soft refreshing rain.

Refrain
All good gifts around us
Are sent from heav’n above,
Then thank the Lord, O thank the Lord
For all his love.

He only is the Maker
Of all things near and far;
He paints the wayside flower,
He lights the evening star;
The winds and waves obey him,
By him the birds are fed;
Much more to us, his children,
He gives our daily bread. Refrain

We thank thee, then, O Father,
For all things bright and good,
The seed time and the harvest,
Our life, our health, our food:
No gifts have we to offer
For all thy love imparts,
But that which thou desirest,
Our humble, thankful hearts. Refrain

Recordings

Original Key in A Flat
The music used in this recording belongs in the Public Domain, but the Performance Copyright ℗ belongs to Richard Irwin. You may click the Download Button to obtain the MP3 recording for use in Worship or for personal use only. For other uses of the recording, please Contact Us.

Click Here to Download
Lower Key in F
The music used in this recording belongs in the Public Domain, but the Performance Copyright ℗ belongs to Richard Irwin. You may click the Download Button to obtain the MP3 recording for use in Worship or for personal use only. For other uses of the recording, please Contact Us.

Click Here to Download

Details

  • Verses: 4
  • Tune: Wir Pflügen
  • Meter: 76 76 D and Refrain
  • Style: Traditional English, Traditional German
  • Usage: Harvest
  • Composer: Johann Abraham Schulz (1747 – 1800)
  • Harmony: John Bacchus Dykes (1823 – 1876)
  • Lyricist: Matthias Claudius (1740 – 1815)
  • Translator: Jane Montgomery Campbell (1817 – 1878)
  • Music and Lyrics Copyright Public Domain
  • Performance Copyright © 2018 Richard M S Irwin. Certain rights reserved.

History

This well-known harvest hymn might appear to come from the English countryside, but it has rather different origins. It is the Peasant’s Song from a sketch by Matthias Claudius in Paul Erdmann’s Fest (Hamburg, 1782), depicting a harvest thanksgiving in a North German farmhouse. Based upon a song heard sung at the home of one of the farmers. Claudius was for some time an atheist, but later renewed his Christian faith. At the time of writing this hymn he was editor of the local paper in Hesse Darmstadt, where he was also a Commissioner of Agriculture.

Originally seventeen verses long, each verse followed by a refrain, the hymn was translated into English by Miss Jane Montgomery Campbell. This translation, though not very literal, attempts to preserve the spirit of the original. It first appeared in Rev Charles S Bere’s A Garland of Songs (1861) and subsequently in the Appendix (1868) to Hymns Ancient and Modern, where verse 3 was revised to the present text from the original:

line 5 – No gifts have we to offer… (rev. Accept the gifts we offer) line 7 – But that which thou desirest… (rev. And, what thou most desirest…)

This alteration was probably introduced to make the hymn suitable for services where harvest produce was on view or offered by the worshippers, although the English Hymnal continues to use the original words.

Come, ye thankful people, come (St George’s Windsor) – Brass Band

Hymn – Come, ye thankful people, come – Lyrics

1. Come, ye thankful people, come,
Raise the song of harvest home!
All is safely gathered in,
Ere the winter storms begin;
God, our Maker, doth provide
For our wants to be supplied;
Come to God’s own temple, come;
Raise the song of harvest home!

2. We ourselves are God’s own field,
Fruit unto his praise to yield;
Wheat and tares together sown
Unto joy or sorrow grown;
First the blade and then the ear,
Then the full corn shall appear;
Grant, O harvest Lord, that we
Wholesome grain and pure may be.

3. For the Lord our God shall come,
And shall take the harvest home;
From His field shall in that day
All offences purge away,
Giving angels charge at last
In the fire the tares to cast;
But the fruitful ears to store
In the garner evermore.

4. Then, thou Church triumphant come,
Raise the song of harvest home!
All be safely gathered in,
Free from sorrow, free from sin,
There, forever purified,
In God’s garner to abide;
Come, ten thousand angels, come,
Raise the glorious harvest home!

Recording

See also Come, ye thankful people, come (Saint George’s Windsor) – Organ

The music used in this recording belongs in the Public Domain, but the Performance Copyright ℗ belongs to Richard Irwin. You may click the Download Button to obtain the MP3 recording for use in Worship or for personal use only. For other uses of the recording, please Contact Us.

Click Here to Download

Details

  • Tune: Saint George’s Windsor
  • Meter: 77 77 D
  • Style: Victorian Hymn
  • Composer: George Job Elvey (1816 – 1893)
  • Lyricist: Henry Alford (1810 – 1871)
  • Church Year: Harvest
  • Music and Lyrics Copyright Public Domain.
  • Performance Copyright ℗ 2016 Richard M S Irwin, Certain rights reserved.

Farmer, farmer, why do you plough

Hymn – Farmer, farmer, why do you plough – Lyrics

We regret that we are unable to publish the lyrics to this hymn at the moment, as they are still in copyright.

Recording Extract

We apologise that because of rules governing copyright means we cannot make a version of this hymn available on our web site for download. Please Click Here to email us about obtaining a recording of this hymn. The recording should only be used during services of Divine Worship and cannot be distributed.

Details

  • Tune: Farmer Farmer
  • Meter: Irregular
  • Style: Traditional English
  • Church Year: Harvest
  • Composer: Susan Sayers – arranger: Richard Mark Stephen Irwin
  • Lyricist: Susan Sayers
  • Music and Lyrics Copyright © 1984 Kevin Mayhew Ltd
  • Performance Copyright © 2008 Richard M S Irwin. Certain rights reserved.

Come, ye thankful people, come (Saint George’s Windsor) – Organ

Hymn – Come, ye thankful people, come – Lyrics

1. Come, ye thankful people, come,
Raise the song of harvest home!
All is safely gathered in,
Ere the winter storms begin;
God, our Maker, doth provide
For our wants to be supplied;
Come to God’s own temple, come;
Raise the song of harvest home!

2. We ourselves are God’s own field,
Fruit unto his praise to yield;
Wheat and tares together sown
Unto joy or sorrow grown;
First the blade and then the ear,
Then the full corn shall appear;
Grant, O harvest Lord, that we
Wholesome grain and pure may be.

3. For the Lord our God shall come,
And shall take the harvest home;
From His field shall in that day
All offences purge away,
Giving angels charge at last
In the fire the tares to cast;
But the fruitful ears to store
In the garner evermore.

4. Then, thou Church triumphant come,
Raise the song of harvest home!
All be safely gathered in,
Free from sorrow, free from sin,
There, forever purified,
In God’s garner to abide;
Come, ten thousand angels, come,
Raise the glorious harvest home!

Recording

See also Come, ye thankful people, come – Brass Band

The music used in this recording belongs in the Public Domain, but the Performance Copyright ℗ belongs to Richard Irwin. You may click the Download Button to obtain the MP3 recording for use in Worship or for personal use only. For other uses of the recording, please Contact Us.

Click Here to Download

Details

  • Tune: Saint George’s Windsor
  • Meter: 77 77 D
  • Style: Victorian Hymn
  • Composer: George Job Elvey (1816 – 1893)
  • Lyricist: Henry Alford (1810 – 1871)
  • Church Year: Harvest
  • Music and Lyrics Copyright Public Domain.
  • Performance Copyright ℗ 2016 Richard M S Irwin, Certain rights reserved.